Your greatest achievement is keeping your people safe. Safety Training & Consulting with our staff of professional safety engineers and facilitators
are here to partner with your safety professionals to maintain that great safety record you already have.

OUR BUSINESS IS YOUR EMR SAFETY RATING!

Safety Training & Consulting staff safety professionals and first responders throughout the United States and Canada, in industries of, mining, construction, manufacturing, oil and gas, pipeline, renewable energy, heavy industry, environmental, occupational health, industrial hygiene and emergency response.

CONSULTING

Offering a high level of industrial expertise, knowledge & regulatory experience for all types of industrial projects.

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SITE SAFETY

Offering extensive on-the-job experience for surges, growth periods & specific project requirements.

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TRAINING

Offering an extensive number of training programs designed to help you meet all regulatory requirements.

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EMERGENCY RESPONSE

Rescue Technician Training is available to instruct your employees in equipment, techniques and rescue principles.

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EMBEDDED SAFETY MANAGER PROGRAM

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One of the most diverse & successful providers of Safety, Health & Environment Consultancy Services and Staffing in the United States.

 

CONSULTING

You are about to undertake a major project that requires planning, staffing, project management, policy creation & training.

Safety Training & Consulting brings a high level of expertise for all types of industrial projects.

SITE SAFETY

You are entering the task phase of a new project & need skill-set-specific personnel on a short-term basis.

Safety Training & Consulting safety experts bring extensive on-the-job experiences for surges, growth & specific project requirements.

TRAINING

Your company must meet mandatory regulatory requirements for safety training to avoid an OSHA audit.

Safety Training & Consulting offers an extensive number of training programs designed to help you meet all regulations.

EMERGENCY RESP.

Rescue Technician Training is available to instruct your employees in equipment, techniques and rescue principles.

Safety Training & Consulting provides comprehensive training, combining the proper use and care of equipment.

WHAT’S NEW WITH STC

Hazard Communication Standard

Hazard Communication Standard Final Rule

New changes to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard are bringing the United States into alignment with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS), further improving safety and health protections for America’s workers. Building on the success of OSHA’s current Hazard Communication Standard, the GHS is expected to prevent injuries and illnesses, save lives and improve trade conditions for chemical manufacturers. The Hazard Communication Standard in 1983 gave the workers the ‘right to know,’ but the new Globally Harmonized System gives workers the ‘right to understand.’

The new hazard communication standard still requires chemical manufacturers and importers to evaluate the chemicals they produce or import and provide hazard information to employers and workers by putting labels on containers and preparing safety data sheets. However, the old standard allowed chemical manufacturers and importers to convey hazard information on labels and material safety data sheets in whatever format they chose. The modified standard provides a single set of harmonized criteria for classifying chemicals according to their health and physical hazards and specifies hazard communication elements for labeling and safety data sheets.

Benefits: The new standard covers over 43 million workers who produce or handle hazardous chemicals in more than five million workplaces across the country. The modification is expected to prevent over 500 workplace injuries and illnesses and 43 fatalities annually. Once fully implemented it will also:

  • Improve the quality and consistency of hazard information in the workplace, making it safer for workers to do their jobs and easier for employers to stay competitive;
  • Enhance worker comprehension of hazards, especially for low and limited-literacy workers, reduce confusion in the workplace, facilitate safety training, and result in safer handling and use of chemicals;
  • Provide workers quicker and more efficient access to information on the safety data sheets;
  • Result in cost savings to American businesses of more than $475 million in productivity improvements, fewer safety data sheet and label updates and simpler new hazard communication training: and
  • Reduce trade barriers by harmonizing with systems around the world.

Rulemaking background: OSHA published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to update the Hazard Communication Standard in September 2009 and held public hearings in March 2010.

Major changes to the Hazard Communication Standard:

  • Hazard classification: Chemical manufacturers and importers are required to determine the hazards of the chemicals they produce or import. Hazard classification under the new, updated standard provides specific criteria to address health and physical hazards as well as classification of chemical mixtures.
  • Labels: Chemical manufacturers and importers must provide a label that includes a signal word, pictogram, hazard statement, and precautionary statement for each hazard class and category.
  • Safety Data Sheets: The new format requires 16 specific sections, ensuring consistency in presentation of important protection information.
  • Information and training: To facilitate understanding of the new system, the new standard requires that workers be trained by December 1, 2013 on the new label elements and safety data sheet format, in addition to the current training requirements.

Changes from the Proposed to the Final Rule: OSHA reviewed the record and revised the Final Rule in response to the comments submitted. Major changes include:

  • Maintaining the disclosure of exposure limits (Threshold Limit Values [TLVs]) established by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial
  • Hygienists (ACGIH) and carcinogen status from nationally and internationally recognized lists of carcinogens on the safety data sheets;
  • Clarification that the borders of pictograms must be red on the label;
  • Flexibility regarding the required precautionary and hazard statements to allow label preparers to consolidate and/or eliminate inappropriate or redundant statements; and
  • Longer deadlines for full implementation of the standard (see the chart below):

What you need to do and when:

  • Chemical users: Continue to update safety data sheets when new ones become available, provide training on the new label elements and update hazard communication programs if new hazards are identified.
  • Chemical Producers: Review hazard information for all chemicals produced or imported, classify chemicals according to the new classification criteria, and update labels and safety data sheets.
Effective Completion Date Requirement(s) Who
December 1, 2013 Train employees on the new label elements and SDS format. Employers
June 1, 2015*

December 1, 2015

Comply with all modified provisions of this final rule, except:

Distributors may ship products labeled by manufacturers under the old system until December 1, 2015.

Chemical manufacturers, importers, distributors and employers
June 1, 2016 Update alternative workplace labeling and hazard communication program as necessary, and provide additional employee training for newly identified physical or health hazards. Employers
Transition Period Comply with either 29 CFR 1910.1200 (this final standard), or the current standard, or both. All chemical manufacturers, importers, distributors and employers

* This date coincides with the European Union implementation date for classification of mixtures.

Flood Safety Tips

Floods can occur anywhere, with floodwaters rising gradually or flash floods striking suddenly. Flash floods are the number one weather-related killer in the United States — most flood fatalities happen because people try to drive through deadly waters rather than avoid them. (Source: Federal Emergency Management Agency, 2005)

Water’s powerful force can easily overtake vehicles caught in a flood. Follow these tips to stay safe in your car during a flood.

How to Drive in a Flood

Pay attention to barricades.

Don’t ignore them by driving past them.

Do not drive through standing water on roads or in parking lots.

The average automobile can be swept off the road in 12 inches of moving water, and roads covered by water are prone to collapse. Attempting to drive through water also may stall your engine, with the potential to cause irreparable damage if you try to restart the engine. If you come upon a flooded street, take an alternate route.

Take extra precautions if you’re forced to drive through water.

If no alternate route exists and you have no other reasonable alternative but to drive through standing water.

  • Do your best to estimate the depth of the water (if other cars are driving through, take note of how deep the water is).
  • Drive slowly and steadily through the water.
  • Avoid driving in water that downed electrical or power lines have fallen in — electric current passes through water easily.
  • Watch for items traveling downstream — they can trap or crush you if you’re in their path.
  • If you have driven through water up to the wheel rims or higher, test your brakes on a clear patch of road at low speed. If they are wet and not stopping the vehicle as they should, dry them by pressing gently on the brake pedal with your left foot while maintaining speed with your right foot.
  • Stay off the telephone unless you must report severe injuries.
  • If your vehicle stalls in the deep water, you may need to restart the engine to make it to safety. Keep in mind that restarting may cause irreparable damage to the engine.
  • If you can’t restart your vehicle and you become trapped in rising water, immediately abandon it for higher ground. Try to open the door or roll down the window to get out of the vehicle. If you are unable to get out safely, call 911 or get the attention of a passerby or someone standing on higher ground so that they may call for help.

Louisiana Flood 2016 – Pumpkin Center -Drone Footage

ROVING SITE SAFETY AUDIT PROGRAM

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Keeping your job site safe.
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All reporting stays up to date.
Motivating your crews.
Operating within full safety compliance.
Copyright 2015. STC, Inc. All Rights Reserved.